#EditorDrawer: My top (or bottom) 10 songs for the beginning of a relationship or fling

“1873 Pierre Auguste Cot – Spring” – Licensed under Public Domain via https://commons.wikimedia.org

Inspired by our LoveLy‘s fun and insightful inaugural articles on dating (where to take a new romantic prospect and where to meet a new romantic prospect), I decided to dig into my memory in search of what to play for different moods or situations in the early stages of a relationship or fling. I’m not saying you should necessarily play these songs to your romantic prospect – though you certainly can if you want to – but that they could perhaps give you some inspiration or extra sighs or tingling spells when thinking of that hot little number you just found. Or perhaps some of the songs will make you cringe. Actually, it’s very likely they will. Forgive me if the list is 90’s heavy, it’s just because back then, in my teenage years, I had lots of crushes (a different one every week, I would say), and would find songs for almost all of them. Some of the songs still remind me of those short-lived dalliances that were a lot more with myself than with the poor boys who often had no idea they were running through my head all day, chased by some bad pop song.

The list, although headlined with numbers and themes, is in no particular order of inspirational or cringe factor…

1. For the blind admiration

2. For the forbidden romance

3. For the rebound

4. For the coffeeshop pickup

5. For the fall

6. For the relationship talk

7. For the indecent proposal

8. For the booty call

9. For the clouded infatuation

10. For the unexpected hookup at the club

If you think anything else should be added to this list, give us a shout (and link) in the comments section.

#Dating: Conventional, modern and extraordinary places to find dates

Conventional, modern and extraordinary places to find dates

By LoveLy

Last time I gave you an inside on special outdoor dating places. Now, it’s time to turn our attention to the places where you can actually find these dates.

We all know the usual occasions where people are supposed to meet potential partners. The all-time favorites are, guess where… at work and through mutual friends. It also happens quite often, that people joining the same clubs for their hobbies take a shine towards each other. Not to forget online dating! Several websites give singles – or those who would like to be one 😉 – the opportunity to meet like-minded people. And it works! Almost every third couple met online! But if you don’t wanna tell your future/prospective kids that you found your wife/husband on eHarmony or Parship, I have other extraordinary and somewhat romantic tips for you…

http://pixabay.com/
http://pixabay.com/

“New in town” groups

You just moved or would like to meet new people in your town? Then join one of these Facebook groups (in Leipzig it is “Neu in Leipzig”). People from all over the world meet in these groups as well as many locals looking for new friends. Although it is not necessarily meant for singles, they tend to represent the largest crowd within these communities! During one of the numerous activities offered there, you will quickly sozialize with some of them. You can look forward to activities such as bowling, sports activities, barbecue in the park, cultural events and clubbing. If there aren’t many such offers in your town, don’t hesitate to offer them yourself! Others might just be waiting for it. The special bonus at these meetings: the atmosphere is so much different from online dating encounters, since dating is not usually the primary reason people join these activities. So make sure, you are also not recognized as a desperate remainder at first sight. Try to make meeting interesting people your primary goal. If somebody special happens to be among them… lucky you!

supermarket-732281_640At the supermarket

Would’t anyone of us like to meet their partner at the supermarket checkout? So why hesitate? Just go for it! Since this idea is really romantic, the chances you’ll get an embarassing rejection are quite low! At first, you should figure out what quantity of food the center of your attention puts into his/her shopping basket. If there is no baby milk and family packs inside, but the small single packages look like this person only shops for one, give it a try! You could just ask for a recommendation of a particular product this person happens to grab or is standing in front of and hope that this small talk offers a chance to exchange numbers. You could also just grab a bottle of wine and ask the nice lady/guy standing next to you, if she/he would like to empty this bottle with you? Or you just go the straight way. Try to get eye contact, start smiling and if a NICE! smile wanders back to you, just tell the person that she/he grabbed your attention and that you would like to get to know her/him. It might not work every time, but one or two strikes should be involved. In Leipzig I can recommend Rewe at the Connewitzer Kreuz and Aldi in the Südvorstadt. 🙂

Karaoke

You are a good singer or just like to sing? Visit a karaoke bar or party (in Leipzig: Kakadu Karaoke Club) ! Some people go there to be on stage performing with their amazing voices, others just go there to have fun and meet people. If you spot an interesting person on stage, don’t hesitate to tell that person afterwards that you really enjoyed his/her singing, or that you really like this song and also thought about singing it. But since this song was “stolen,” he/she owes you a duet now! The chances of a rejection are barely there, believe me! Then it’s on the both of you to find a duet you agree on, and when on stage, the chances of some sparks happening between you are surely there!

http://pixabay.com/
http://pixabay.com/

Other locations to meet many potential singles on the prowl:

Language classes – flirting is a language we all understand. 😉
Salsa classes – find out if you move in the same direction. 🙂
Clubbing – make sure you visit clubs that are not too big and where people your age go to! In Leipzig Elsterartig and Altes Landratsamt are good places for singles.
The outdoors – locations where you can sit together, drink and listen to music in warm weather, such as parks, bridges (Sachsenbrücke in Leipzig) and lakes (all especially in the evening).

Last but not least (definitely “outside the box” thinking):

Mitfahrgelegenheit/ride sharing: many singles use this kind of transportation; you have the same destination that day, and might find out you also have the same destination in your future.

If you would like to share your own experiences with me and other readers or get some extra insights, just post a comment here or visit me on my new Facebook page.

(Note from the editor: Due to the great success of LoveLy’s first column, #Dating will now be running every other Saturday.)

#Music: “The Journey to Afrika began in Leipzig” (or a love letter of sorts to Dagobert)

The Journey to Afrika began in Leipzig

By Sabine Wiesner

At the time of writing this article, the Swiss singer Dagobert will play his last shows of his extensive tour through Germany, Switzerland and Austria. Within the course of a month he presented his second album, entitled Afrika, in more than twenty places. The opening show took place in Leipzig’s Ilses Erika, where Switzerland’s Best Dressed Man of 2013 entertained a small, but dedicated crowd. High time for an introduction to this unusual artist.

I have a confession to make and it feels much easier to do so now, in the aftermath of the WGT with its broad acceptance of the most fantastic quirks. My latest musical obsession is a Schlager singer. Please don’t get me wrong, I don’t believe in dismissing entire genres of music, but since my late teens I was raised on a strict diet of guitar-based Indie rock with the occasional pop classic strewn in. Ever since I had a clear-cut idea of what is cool and Schlager clearly wasn’t. In the case of Dagobert, however, there’s no way of denying it. There are catchy tunes, there are the sha-la-la choruses and German lyrics which were on my lips in a matter of a heartbeat.

How could that happen? I cannot trace back why I ever clicked on my first music video by him, it was “Ich Bin Zu Jung” from his eponymous debut album, but I was hooked in an instant. Its black and white mute film aesthetics gave it a timeless air. I saw an attractive, tall guy in a tailcoat gazing unblinkingly into the camera, singing his song undisturbed by the woman silently crying at his side. Both were simply walking down the street, the woman clinging on to him and talking to him, but to no avail. Three times the woman at his side changed, one gesticulating more than the others, yet all of them were clearly in distress. On top of the upbeat melody, Dagobert’s lyrics tell us the story of a futile relationship. Now who cannot relate to this topic? What is remarkable though, is Dagobert’s sincerity.

Upon leaving school, he won an art scholarship. He went to Berlin and squandered all the scholarship money. On returning broke to his home country, he took the chance of living in a mountain cabin in the Canton of Graubünden. He had planned to stay for a year, this year turned into five. He admits that the long completely isolated winters made him pretty dejected. Not only did he experiment with the existential questions of how to sustain himself in the cheapest and most practical way (he chose to have a pot of rice each day), but also with what sort of songwriting he wanted to perform as an artist. His greatest musical influences were Die Flippers, the model band of German Schlager of the nineties and the hard rocking Scorpions who had their heyday in the eighties. Combine this with his somewhat immature liking for the Donald Duck pocket books which were popular with children in the nineties (hence his name, taken from Donald’s tight-fisted yet elegant uncle) and an admiration for Bela Lugosi, and you can already figure out what you will get in a show.

On the evening of April 27th, I was looking forward to a bit of glamour, a bit of kitsch and a bit of singing along and couldn’t wait for the Austrian support band SIND to clear the stage for the main act. To me, they looked and sounded a bit like a Hipster version of Casper, judging from the half-shouted, husky vocals of the singer. At least their idea of a drunken serenade under a balcony is Oasis“Wonderwall,” which amused me a little.

The crowd gave their polite applause. To my surprise and slight horror Dagobert entered the tiny stage in a non-descript piece of clothing. It was a dark-grey overall and I hoped he would take it off soon. He launched into a song and into another, introduced himself, his musicians and his new album. And of course he eventually slipped out of this hideous overall. Underneath he wore his trademark black pants topped with a cummerbund and a garishly coloured shirt. And he didn’t stop there. Crammed on the small stage there was a dressing screen, behind which he changed into a white shirt and a black blazer, and later into a curious kneelength coat without sleeves. Throughout the concert he kept the crowd entertained with sparse announcements. Especially during the performance of the eerily sounding “Hast Du Auch Soviel Spaß,” Dagobert instructed the audience to sing along to the backing vocals.At one point he teased us with the question of what would come next. It was neither “Ich Bin Zu Jung” nor “Zehn Jahre” as some concert goers suggested, but the stomping “Ich Mag Deine Freunde Nicht.”

A very outspoken message, one that could be bought in the shape of tote bags and shirts at the merch stands in the hallway of the “Ilse.” And exactly there he stood in a Kreator t-shirt to be approached for an autograph and a selfie after the show. Of course I used the chance to have a small chat based on a very memorable holiday I once enjoyed in Graubünden, just one valley apart from where Dagobert isolated himself. He seemed a little disappointed that I had stayed there a fortnight only. And then he gave me the hint that Die Flippers wrote a song with my name. One day later I looked it up on the Internet and realised once again: Schlager really is unbearable. Dagobert, however, is in a class of his own.

#Food: Restaurant review – Jimmy Orpheus at Leipzig west

Our food columnist - Photo by A. Köpping
Our food columnist at Jimmy Orpheus – Photo by A. Köpping

Jimmy Orpheus in Schleußig

By Alexandra Athanasopoulou Köpping

So when I moved to Schleußig two years ago, I thought this neighborhood was great in terms of quality of life (like supermarket, bakeries and general nice feeling) but lacked nice places to hang out and have a coffee. That until three weeks ago when I discovered that this new place, Jimmy Orpheus, had opened at Industriestraße 18. When I saw the place while driving back home, I said to myself, I must go and try it.

To be honest I have not been disappointed. Coming from Brussels where restaurants and coffee places have a lot of competition and therefore need to keep really high standards, I was a bit disappointed when I first moved here. First of all I thought that generally, restaurants and bars do not pay enough attention to aesthetics (even in places that have a strong food concept), and secondly I find the service mediocre (sometime even in expensive places).

Photo by A. Köpping
Photo by A. Köpping

So in terms of aesthetics I was positively surprised because the owners paid a great deal of attention to all the details, from the colors of the walls to the menu; they had a holistic approach that goes not unnoticed. When you enter the café you immediately feel the fifties ambiance from the lamps to the tables and chairs. I was amazed by the coherence of the décor. The big framed pictures add a funky edge to the sobriety of the décor.

Photo by A. Köpping
Photo by A. Köpping

Then comes the menu. Instead of opting for a classical printed menu, the owners opted to invest a bit more in the design. The doodles of the food and drinks totally worked for me. In terms of content, their menu focused on quality instead of quantity; they have four breakfast options and perhaps six or seven lunch options, but almost all their products are regional and organic. I also tend to trust small menus more than large ones, because with small menus you can be sure that most of the products will be fresh and not ready-made, because it’s easier to manage for the kitchen. I also appreciated their organic tea selection and the fact that their alcoholic drinks are not well-known commercial brands.

Photo by A. Köpping
Photo by A. Köpping

Now in terms of taste, I had the scrambled eggs breakfast, along with bread, butter and sour cherry marmelade. It was good but a bit simple, I would have liked my eggs a bit more spicy. I really liked the sour cherry marmalade. For lunch I tried the milk rice with the apfelmuss and I have to say it tasted really good, it was not too sweet and the creaminess was perfect. In terms of service, the staff is very friendly but on a Sunday you should expect to wait a bit for your breakfast. If you go during the week, it is a very quick service.

My conclusion: If you are somewhere in Schleußig, make sure to go have a drink or a bite there. For those who live there, I think this place has the potential to become a regular hangout place.

#MoviesOmU: English language and other non-dubbed version showings in Leipzig, May 28-June 3

https://openclipart.org
https://openclipart.org

This week marks the beginning of the Sommerkino auf der Feinkost, with a huge screen set up at the Feinkost complex in Südvorstadt for the summer evenings (though you can hardly call it that at the moment, with this schizophrenic weather). In the city center, this Monday once again brings us the OmU Sneak Preview at Cinestar, meaning you don’t know what movie will be playing, but it will be brand new and in its original language (most likely English), and you will pay less for your ticket.

But without further ado: Here’s our regular Wednesday listing of movies being shown in English and other original languages (with labels such as OmU, OF and OV) at Leipzig cinemas for the next seven days. Although not dubbed, they often come with German subtitles, so you can still access the movie if you don’t know the original language but know some German. For descriptions, just click on the movie titles. Our OmU listing for the past movie week (up to Wed., 27/5) can be found at http://bit.ly/1euqjtJ.

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THURSDAY, MAY 28

19:30

A Most Violent Year (2014) – USA, English, drama/thriller
Cinémathèque in der naTo, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 46, 04275 Leipzig

21:30

Leviafan [Leviathan] (2014) – Russia, Russian, drama
Cineding, Karl-Heine-Str. 83, 04229 Leipzig

22:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

FRIDAY, MAY 29

21:30

Leviafan [Leviathan] (2014) – Russia, Russian, drama
Cineding, Karl-Heine-Str. 83, 04229 Leipzig

22:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

22:30

Lost River (2014) – USA, English, drama/fantasy/mystery (Ryan Gosling‘s directorial debut)
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

22:45

Big Eyes (2014)  USA, English, drama/biopic
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

SATURDAY, MAY 30

21:30

Leviafan [Leviathan] (2014) – Russia, Russian, drama
Cineding, Karl-Heine-Str. 83, 04229 Leipzig

22:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

22:30

Lost River (2014) – USA, English, drama/fantasy/mystery (Ryan Gosling‘s directorial debut)
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

22:45

Chef [Kiss the Cook] (2014) – USA, English, comedy
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

22:45

Big Eyes (2014)  USA, English, drama/biopic
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

SUNDAY, MAY 31

19:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

20:30

Lost River (2014) – USA, English, drama/fantasy/mystery (Ryan Gosling‘s directorial debut)
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

MONDAY, JUNE 1

20:00

Sneak Preview (???)
Cinestar, Petersstr. 44, 04109 Leipzig

20:00

Chef [Kiss the Cook] (2014) – USA, English, comedy
Schauburg, Antonienstr. 21, 04229 Leipzig

20:30

Lost River (2014) – USA, English, drama/fantasy/mystery (Ryan Gosling‘s directorial debut)
Passage Kinos, Hainstr. 19a, 04109 Leipzig

21:30

Nick Cave: 20,000 Days on Earth (2014) – UK, English, documentary/drama/music
Sommerkino auf der Feinkost, Karl-Liebknecht-Straße 36, 04107 Leipzig

TUESDAY, JUNE 2

20:00

A girl walks home alone at night (2014) USA, Persian, horror/romance/thriller
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

21:30

Cobain: Montage of Heck (2015) – USA, English, music documentary
Sommerkino auf der Feinkost, Karl-Liebknecht-Straße 36, 04107 Leipzig

21:30

Leviafan [Leviathan] (2014) – Russia, Russian, drama
Cineding, Karl-Heine-Str. 83, 04229 Leipzig

22:00

White Shadow (2013) – Tanzania/Italy/Germany, Swahili, drama
Cinémathèque in der naTo, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 46, 04275 Leipzig

22:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3

20:00

A girl walks home alone at night (2014) USA, Persian, horror/romance/thriller
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

21:30

Leviafan [Leviathan] (2014) – Russia, Russian, drama
Cineding, Karl-Heine-Str. 83, 04229 Leipzig

22:00

White Shadow (2013) – Tanzania/Italy/Germany, Swahili, drama
Cinémathèque in der naTo, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 46, 04275 Leipzig

22:00

Chce sie zyc [In meinem Kopf ein Universum] (2013) – Poland, Polish, drama
Schaubühne Lindenfels, Karl-Heine-Str. 50, 04229 Leipzig

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For more movies available in Leipzig for the next seven days, visit http://www.playerweb.de.

#LeipzigEvents: Asia in the African imaginary and from the perspective of a South African scholar, June 3

Scarlett Cornelissen, https://www.zv.uni-leipzig.de/en/research/ral/leibniz-programme/leibniz-professorship.html
Scarlett Cornelissen, https://www.zv.uni-leipzig.de/en/research/ral/leibniz-programme/leibniz-professorship.html

A very well-accomplished but apparently quite modest fellow glocal will be speaking in Leipzig on Wednesday, June 3. I’ve been to her current class at Leipzig University and have had a coffee with her; besides constantly encouraging other students to speak their mind, she listened to me babble on about my PhD work and showed much interest and patience, while refusing to talk about the very meaningful work she’s done.

It’s the inaugural lecture of Prof. Scarlett Cornelissen, the recently appointed Leibniz Professor at Leipzig University’s Research Academy. Prof. Cornelissen, who is based at Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, has written many publications, won several prestigious awards, lived in different continents, and currently teaches and does research on foreign policy, political economy, and general trans-national and -regional relations, especially between Asia and Africa. Her lecture next Wednesday is entitled “Asia in the African Scholarly Imaginary.” It sounds intriguing to me, so I’ll go, and also to show my support to this very nice and knowledgable lady we’re lucky to have with us for the summer. The lecture starts at 5:15 p.m. and lasts until 6:45 p.m., at the Alter Senatssaal, Ritterstr. 26, 04109 Leipzig. It’s open to the general public.

#Travel: On interning with the UN around Europe – some ins and outs, ups and downs

UN Geneva - Photo by A. Ribeiro
UN Geneva, June 2011 – Photo by A. Ribeiro
What I gained from my stint at the WHO

By Ana Beatriz Ribeiro

It’s not necessarily easy to land an internship with the United Nations system. And it’s not only because it’s competitive and you often need to “be at the right place at the right time” or “know the right people,” but also because it’s expensive. Sure, you don’t have to pay to intern with them, but the norm is you don’t get paid anything as an intern there. So you have to pay to get to the city where you’re going, sometimes across the world, and then support yourself once there. Which is no walk in the park, to say the least, in places like Copenhagen and Geneva, where the only inexpensive item seems to be naturally occurring oxygen. Which means the average person (i.e. without rich parents, sufficient savings, a scholarship, or ability to leave their job or put it on hold to take an unpaid gig with not much of a prospect for a position afterwards) is usually out. They’re unable to even get in the door of the exclusive club of the very international organizations preaching empowerment and “human development.” 

Copenhagen - Photo by A. Ribeiro
Copenhagen, Fall 2010 – Photo by A. Ribeiro
Those two are precisely the cities where I happened to get internships, both with the World Health Organization. Luckily, I had a scholarship that covered my Master studies tuition and basic living expenses, as well as some savings I had accrued over the past decade. I had no connections at the WHO; but, also luckily, I decided to go with a friend one evening in early 2011 to a happy hour in Copenhagen where we knew some UN people would be hanging out. This friend of mine is quite charming, and impressed someone to the point where she got an internship offer on the spot, plus some other internship ads via e-mail. (Yeah, she’s one of those people.) She forwarded me one of the ads, I responded to it, and ended up getting an internship as well after being interviewed at their office, at WHO/Europe. I then had a very productive unpaid six months with their Web team – helping make social media campaigns, videos and podcasts. While at it, I warded off the boredom of not having an actual job and only having one class left at Roskilde University. I made nice acquaintances. I added an attractive line to my curriculum vitae. But by the end of it, I knew there was most likely no point in hoping for a job, in light of the big financial crisis the organization was undergoing, and the depressingly temporary contracts people were being put on when they were fortunate enough to be hired. Similar story at other UN organizations, according to friends of mine who’ve interned and worked for them.

WHO Headquarters, Geneva, June 2011 - Photo by A. Ribeiro
WHO Headquarters, Geneva, June 2011 – Photo by A. Ribeiro
Still, I decided I wanted to do it again. I wanted to get away from Denmark for the summer, so why not try to go to Geneva, to the WHO headquarters there. They have one of the biggest internship programs in the UN system, with some 250 interns coming in the summer I applied (2011), having a variety of hands-on experiences, fewer or more opportunities, more or less access, their own fixed desk and computer or not even that. I put my name and info into a WHO database and somehow caught people’s attention. One of the several offers I surprisingly got, and the one I’d eventually go for, came from the organization’s ePORTUGUÊSe network. As part of a Portuguese-speaking team, I’d be helping take care of online platforms (i.e. a blog) aimed at spreading health-related and other information to and about the PALOPs, or African Countries of Official Portuguese Language. Another task would be to help assemble Blue Trunk Libraries to be sent to those countries.

Geneva - Photo by A. Ribeiro
Geneva – Photo by A. Ribeiro
Turns out I was given my own desk and computer. I brought in my experience with blogging and podcasting, got along very well with my fellow interns – from Brazil, Portugal and Mozambique – and came to admire my boss very much for her passion and drive. Even amid the financial crisis threatening many UN jobs with extinction, my boss kept engaging and pressing on assiduously. She kept teaching us all she could about the PALOPs, lent us books and made us do research, which was good for me, because I knew next to nothing about the former Portuguese colonies besides Brazil. A few years later in 2015, my former boss announced that WHO would do away with the Portuguese-language program and she’d be retiring; the outpouring of laments and support from health personnel in the PALOPs was impressive and touching (I still get the e-mails from their health information exchange platform). They all hoped there’d be a way to continue this important service in some way. But who knows how WHO figures out its priorities…

Pit stop on bike tour around the Geneva Lake, July 2011
Pit stop on bike tour around the Geneva Lake, July 2011 – Photo by A. Ribeiro
Once again I knew pretty quickly that my internship wouldn’t be evolving into a paid position. So I didn’t put much effort into trying to network with WHO staff or attend meetings during my two months or so there. I preferred to hang out with my fellow interns, and on the weekends blow all my money on traveling by train all over breathtakingly beautiful and pricey Switzlerland. And one time by bicycle all around the Geneva Lake (which I highly recommend), because I couldn’t afford to rent a car there. I did become quite interested in something beyond the internship and Switzerland, however: the countries we were dealing with in Africa. Especially Mozambique, because of its history and position in the “development cooperation” scheme and relations with Brazil, but initially because of my fellow intern and the things she’d tell me about her country. My friendship with her and the other lovely lady interns went well beyond the internship period, and I ended up staying with her for about three weeks in Maputo, doing research for my Master thesis. I’d spend the next four to five years writing about Brazil-Mozambique relations in academia, an idea I probably wouldn’t have had if I hadn’t met her and my former boss, and hadn’t gone through the internship in Geneva. So the benefit I got from it for my professional life was totally unexpected, unrelated to UN jobs in the end.

Near Jungfrau mountain, August 2011 - Photo by A. Ribeiro
Near Jungfrau mountain, August 2011 – Photo by A. Ribeiro
In sum, I recommend an internship with the WHO and UN in general if you can figure out how to afford it, get in the door and manage your expectations: I’d say go in with an open mind, and primarily the desire to meet interesting people from various countries and get to know new places and practices. Oh, and with the certainty you’ll have the chance to make your curriculum a bit shinier, of course, since the “UN” acronym still carries quite a bit of weight (besides the organization’s cumbersomeness). Everything else along (and beyond) the way would be a bonus.

#LeipzigEvents: Wave-Gotik-Treffen in 100 photos

IMG_3057
Südfriedhof Cemetery, photo by A. Kliushnyk

Exquisitely dressed dames from the Victorian era, or straight out of an Anne Rice novel. Horned, winged, mythical creatures. Maleficent. Anime characters. Characters from the Dark Ages. Dudes and dudettes from the punk ages. Skulls. Apparitions. And simply people wearing black shirts and bottoms like my friend and I were – the two mesmerized by the gothic wave thickening across town. Hundreds of them descended on Leipzig for Wave-Gotik-Treffen this weekend, many from Germany but some from other countries, too. Besides their diverse, often elaborate makeup and costumes underlining their style of choice within the gothic palette (of also diverse music styles), they came in every possible age and configuration (solo, groups of friends, couples, families), turning the streets of the city carnavalesque; but in a much more alternative, darker way than in  Berlin, which was having Karneval der Kulturen simultaneously. There was even an extra bus, just for their festival – Number 31. They were on their way to theme parties, engaging in cemetery tours, simply chilling out drinking coffee and smoking cigarettes, shopping, standing in line for a currywurst, or waiting at the tram stop, when my friend and I approached them with our cameras like hungry paparazzi. We were feeling a bit creepy stalking them across streets, parks and even a graveyard, but they were graceful to us even when they didn’t want their pictures online or taken at all. Many of them actually welcomed our interest, and that they would get to see their pictures posted. So here’s to the very nice and impressively dedicated Gotik Treffen attendants who made our weekend so worth it, and my friend’s first visit to Leipzig from Berlin so unforgettable. One hundred pictures from our treffen trek.

PHOTOS BY ALLA KLIUSHNYK AND ANA RIBEIRO (c) – CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

#LeipzigEvents: Women’s Festival, May 30

http://http://www.leipzig.de/
http://http://www.leipzig.de/

In the framework of special events for the yearlong “1000 years of Leipzig” fest, Stadt Leipzig will reserve the market square in the city center to celebrate women. Starting at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 30, dance performances, jazz, pop and hip-hop, a poetry slam and other attractions will take over Marktplatz for Leipziger Frauen Festival 2015. According to Stadt Leipzig, the event aims to publicly celebrate women’s “sovereignty, individuality and joie de vivre. This festival sees itself as an impulse-giving cultural event: women conquering public space.” For more information about the Women’s Festival, the first of its kind in Leipzig, visit http://www.leipzigerfrauenfestival.de.